More on Robotics

Tech Policy Lab Joins Partnership on Artificial Intelligence

The Tech Policy Lab is delighted to be joining the Partnership on AI to Benefit People and Society, a non-profit organization charged with exploring and developing best practices for AI. The Lab, which aims to position policymakers, broadly defined, to make wiser and more inclusive tech policy, joins a diverse range of voices from academia, industry and non-profit organizations committed to collaboration and open dialogue on the opportunities and rising challenges around AI.

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The Lab has worked to advance AI in the public interest since our inception, through conferences, workshops, and research, among other initiatives.  In 2015, we organized the fourth annual robotics law and policy conference, WeRobot. And in 2016, we co-organized the Obama White House’s inaugural public workshop on AI, focusing on legal and governance implications of AI.  Our research focuses on the policy implications of AI and includes studying AI-connected devices in the home.

We are planning many more research initiatives around AI, including AI-assisted decision-making, AI and cybersecurity, and AI and diversity. We will bring to our AI research our commitment to the inclusion of diverse perspectives in tech policy research and outcomes, including our Diverse Voices method (made available earlier this year through our How-To Guide) which engages diverse panels of “experiential” experts in short, targeted conversations around a technology to improve inclusivity in tech policy outcomes.

The Partnership on AI will be a great network and resource as we undertake this work. We look forward to collaborating with a diverse group of stakeholders from industry, academia, and policy around the Partnership on AI’s goals: to develop and share best practices, advance public understanding of AI, create a diverse network of experts around AI, and examine AI’s impact on people and society.

About the Tech Policy Lab

The Tech Policy Lab is a unique, interdisciplinary research unit at the University of Washington. The Lab’s mission is to position policymakers, broadly defined, to make wiser and more inclusive tech policy.  Situated within a globally renowned research university, the Tech Policy Lab is committed to advancing artificial intelligence in the public interest through research, analysis, and education and outreach. To learn more about the Lab’s cutting edge research, thought leadership, and education initiatives, go to www.techpolicylab.uw.edu.

About the Partnership on AI

The Partnership on AI to Benefit People and Society (Partnership on AI) is a not-for-profit organization, founded by Amazon, Apple, Google/DeepMind, Facebook, IBM and Microsoft.  Our goals are to study and formulate best practices on the development, testing, and fielding of AI technologies, advancing the public’s understanding of AI, to serve as an open platform for discussion and engagement about AI and its influences on people and society and identify and foster aspirational efforts in AI for socially beneficial purposes. We actively designed the Partnership on AI to bring together a diverse range of voices from for-profit and non-profit, all of whom share our belief in the tenets and are committed to collaboration and open dialogue on the many opportunities and rising challenges around AI. For the full list of founding members and partners, go to https://www.partnershiponai.org/partners/.

Faculty Director Ryan Calo Testifies Before German Parliament

On June 22, 2016 C0-Director Calo testified before the German Parliament, the Bundestag. He answered questions as part of a hearing before the Committee on the Digital Agenda on “The Effects of Robotics on Economics, Labour and Society. He answered questions about the application of robotics, automation, and artificial intelligence for economic growth; and identified a number of issues regulatory issues legislators will face. Read more here.

Guest Post: Robot Operator License: Educating Teleoperated Robot Users to Increase Public Safety

Sarah Hubbard, a student Research Assistant with the Lab, and Hannah Misenar just recently completed their Information School Capstone on a concept they call the “Robot Operator License”. After being exposed to a variety of tech policy issues with emerging technologies through the Lab, Sarah was interested in exploring the challenges and opportunities with the integration of teleoperated robots into society. Below is a description of their project.

Robot Operator License: Educating Teleoperated Robot Users to Increase Public Safety

by Sarah Hubbard and Hannah Misenar

 

Following the path of Moore’s Law, teleoperated robots are becoming more accessible and ubiquitous in the everyday consumers life — forever changing the way we work and interact with the world around us. In order to maintain public safety in a society cohabited by humans and machines, the Robot Operator License ensures that users have completed training and received a license to operate their robot. This educational course provides critical information and interactive simulations in an effort to smoothly transition this technology into the modern world.

Developed in partnership with the UW CSE Human-Centered Robotics Lab, the Robot Operator License is designed for the Beam+ telepresence robot, which serves as a proof-of­-concept and demonstrates a need for this type of operational education. This course aims to tackle the policy challenges and threats to public safety due to the use of teleoperated robots by the everyday individual.

View the project video here. Visit the Robot Operator License online course here.  

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Artificial Intelligence: Law and Policy

On Tuesday, May 24, the Lab and the UW School of Law co-hosted the first of four White House public workshops on artificial intelligence. Deputy CTO Ed Felton and other members of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy spoke on panels and were in attendance for the workshop. Other speakers included Lab Co-Director Ryan Calo, Oren Etzioni, Kellye Testy, R. David Edelman, Pedro Domingos, Deirdre Mulligan, Kate Crawford, Jack Balkin, and Camille Fischer.

The event was covered by The New York Times, MIT Technology Review, and The Seattle Times.

More information about The White House workshop series on the risks and benefits of artificial intelligence can be found here.

Tech Policy Primer Videos

Primer Videos for Concepts in Tech & Law

 

What is a bot?

What is Product Liability?

What is Robot?

 

What is Machine Learning?

What is an Algorithm?

What is Administrative Law?