Blog

Bad laws would hurt good drones

130208192205-drone-launch-story-top

Ryan Calo writes at CNN on the uneasy collision of drones and privacy:

An Alitalia passenger jet pilot said he saw a drone over Brooklyn on Monday. Whether it’s true or not — the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating — we are going to be hearing more and more about drones in American skies.

Drones Come Home, Privacy Concerns Fly High

Ryan Calo appears on Talk of the Nation to discuss drones and privacy law:

Well Ari, you know, there’s very little in the way of American privacy law that stands in the way of drones. You know, there is no, for instance, reasonable expectation of privacy in public or from something viewable from a public vantage like your backyard. And on top of that, there’s no reasonable expectation of privacy in contraband.

And the reason that those two things matter is that that means that law enforcement largely is able to fly a drone around looking at public spaces, people at people’s yards, anything that’s visible from the air basically, and the Constitution doesn’t have much to say about it.

Yoshi Kohno on “Can Science Stop Crime?”

The Seattle Times discusses Tadayoshi Kohno’s appearance on NOVA scienceNOW, in an episode that examines whether science can help solve crime.

Appearing at the end of the hourlong show, Kohno demonstrates how he hacks into a car — opening its doors, starting the engine, and then, dramatically, taking control of its brakes to bring the vehicle to a skidding stop. Every system out there could be compromised in some way, by some adversary,” Kohno said. “My biggest concern about the future is we’re going to have this ubiquitous ‘Internet of things,’ but we haven’t thought adequately about computer security.”

Watch the episode here.

Tadayoshi Kohno on Computer Security and How to Think Like the Bad Guy

Yoshi Kohno talks computer security with Xconomy:

We’re seeing computers in all aspects of our lives, in medical devices, exercise equipment, cars, airplanes, utility systems, power lines, everywhere,” Kohno said. “One of my main concerns is that while we’ve thought a lot about security for our desktop computers, computing is much broader than that, and we need to address security for all of it.